• info@greatmigrationcamps.com

Great Migration: Where to cross the Mara River?

Part 2: Where the wildebeest cross the Mara River?

Knowing where the wildebeest cross the river, can improve your great migration experience,  as you should choose which side of the river to observe the wildebeest crossing the Mara River.  If the herds cross to the north then it is probably better to be on the northern bank of the river and visa versa for the return journey.

Where the wildebeest cross the Mara River?  Changing crossing points 

In Part 1 we talked about favourite or geographically determined crossing points for the wildebeest during the Mara River Crossing Season.  This also changes!  The Mara River Floods of 2018 and 2020, changed its course, making new bends in the river and causing a shift in Crossing Points.  Knowing recent climatic events can get you front row seats to observe this natural show.

Where the wildebeest cross the Mara River?  The inside bend

Let’s take a river crossing example.

The river crossings from South to North take place in the inside bends of the Mara River:-  these are crossing points Makutano, No 8,  No 6, N0 4,  No 3 and No 1 in front of Singita.
The return journey from North to South, takes place on the alternate (now inside bends) of the river at crossing points No 2, No 5, No 7 and No 9.

Where the wildebeest cross the Mara River?  Early season crossings

The crossings early on in the season will come from the Eastern side.  The eastern herds are mostly bachelor herds, with fewer obstacles in their way, so they move quickly.  The first river crossings of the year will probably be Sand River crossings between Bologonja Spring and the Sand/Mara river confluence. Sand River crossings have taken place as early as June.
The first Mara River crossings are commonly at No 10, No 9, No 8 and Makutano in July each year.
When the western herds arrive from Ikorongo and the Grumeti Reserves they would start crossing at the western crossing points from late July onwards at crossing points No 1 – 4 and perhaps at No 5 and No 6 in front of Sayari.

Conservation Talking Points

Flash flooding and fast runoffs during the dry season (July – October). Fast flowing water is difficult for wildlife and animals to judge in general.  The wildebeest sometimes miss the exit points of the Mara River due to the strength of the fast flowing water of the Mara River, resulting in drowning.  These changing climatic conditions (Floods 2018, 2020) have an impact on the survival rate of the Mara River crossings.   The solutions can often be found in the catchment area, the source of the Mara River, the area where trees should be holding the water.

In case you missed Part 1 in our river-crossing series:  here’s the link.   Great Migration 2022: Where to cross the Mara River? 

Book now to see the Great Wildebeest Migration:  info@greatmigrationcamps.com
Contact us now for River Crossing availability 2022 season.
Follow our migration updates from the Serengeti National Park here:  Great Migration Updates

Great Migration ’22: Where to cross the Mara River?

Part 1: Where to cross the Mara River?

The Mara River Crossings of the wildebeest & zebra, of the annual Great Migration in Tanzania & Kenya is an event like no other in the natural world.  It’s not a single event, nor a single herd, nor a single stretch of river, nor a specific date or time.  Wildebeest crossing the Mara River is a visually magnificent 3-D, confusion of tangible adrenalin with stereo sound.  In the animal history world, these dramatic & chaotic river crossing scenes must rank at the top due to the raw visual, auditory & sensory intensity.  It will take your breath away.  The 2022 Mara River Crossings are the next event in our part of the planet.

In case you missed it: The Great Migration Explained 2022 

Things to consider when crossing a river

As kids we were taught various bush survival skills which included river crossing techniques for our safety.  We knew if the river was too wide, flowing too fast or was too high & discoloured, the crossing point was not acceptable. Acceptable crossing places had shallow water, easy banks to get out on the other side and a nice gravel or boulder river bed.  Deep, slow water was okay if it wasn’t too wide.  As humans we had to remove loose clothing, belts & backpacks.

  • Watch the far bank
  • Don’t fight the current
  • Don’t grab logs or rocks
  • Try to move side on to the current

Where to cross a river

Where to cross a River? Crossing points

The first question was whether we had to cross or not. Was there an alternative option?

It we had to cross, the second question was where to cross the river. What is the best river crossing point?

  • The nature of the river bed (is it sand, gravel, rocks, boulders?)
  • Speed of river flow
  • Depth of the water
  • Turbulence of the water
  • Temperature (coldness) of the water
  • Capabilities of the group
  • Entry and exit points
  • Run out

Where to cross the Mara River?  Crossing Points for the Great Migration 2022

  • The Mara River is almost 400 km long and is wide, craggy and treacherous.
  • It is home to Africa’s largest crocodile population.
  • The Mara River represents the end of a long challenging journey for the wildebeest.
  • It makes logical sense that the wildebeest are hesitant to cross the river when they arrive, making them seem aimless and indecisive.
  • Despite facing the same river risks as humans, such as drowning in strong currents, or breaking a leg on rocks or river bank entries – the wildebeest must also contend with predators (crocodiles & carnivores)
  • The wildebeest cross the Mara River on instinct, in a bi annual ritual- what goes north, must return south. The herds cross the Mara River at least twice, sometimes more.
  • Humans have spent decades documenting the wildebeest movements to make it easier for ourselves to witness this river crossing event. The most commonly used geographical areas of the river have been named or numbered as Crossing Points.
  • Each point is a stretch of river not a single GPS location and is used as a guideline for finding the wildebeest
Mara-River-Crossings-2022
Tanapa-Crossing-Points-Mara-River-2022

Mara River Crossings 2022: What to expect from the wildebeest?

  • NOTHING! They are unpredictable.
  • When a herd of wildebeest arrives on the banks of the Mara River, they usually search for a place to cross where the banks are not too steep and the water not flowing too fast.
  • The buildup is tense. Hours or days can be spent waiting near a crossing point before they get enough numbers and courage to leap into the Mara River.
  • Triggers can cause many false starts for the wildebeest.  The ultimate trigger starts an adrenalin charged surge into the water and a race to the opposite river banks & perceived safety.
  • They are in the zone seemingly oblivious to the known dangers- they swim frantically, grunt loudly and move as a mass of nervous energy.
  • Exiting on the opposite bank, can be gentle and gradual or often tragically a near vertical slope where any good foothold changes to a slippery mudbank, with every passing hoof.  The glistening bodies fight against each other to get out and avoid sliding back to the watery nightmare.
  • Unbelievably, within ten minutes the wildebeest can be seen calming grazing with little or no indication of their ordeal – for them it’s just another day.

Mara River Crossing Points 2022:  Human behaviour at the crossings 

  • The main objective is to observe the river crossings but not alter or impact the outcome of a crossing.
  • Wildlife always has right of way, don’t obstruct.
  • Waiting for a river crossing, vehicles should be stationary and out of sight of the animals.  It is common to see safari jeeps hiding behind the tree line to avoid windshield reflections or other distractions.
  • There are parking areas at the crossing points – designed to stop the vehicles frightening or blocking a river crossing.
  • ONLY when the wildebeest have started to cross the river, may safari vehicles approach the river slowly.  (In reality there is a race to the river for the best viewing spot of the greatest animal migration in Africa along the river bank.)
  • Do we even need to say it?  Stay in the vehicle (we are not the only animals watching the wildebeest)

Part 2:  Where Wildebeest Cross the Mara River

Book now to see the Great Wildebeest Migration:  info@greatmigrationcamps.com
Contact us now for River Crossing availability 2022 season.
Follow our migration updates from the Serengeti National Park here:  Great Migration Updates 

“Seasons” of the Great Wildebeest Migration 2022

The Great Wildebeest Migration happens 365 days a year but we’re the only ones that can guarantee you’ll see it. We don’t wait for the herds to come to us, we take you to them – leaving no trace.  We follow the wildebeest in our small pioneering camp according to the wildebeest and their movements.  Great Migration Camps is headed north for crossing season 2022.

Calving Season (January- March)

  • Almost 2 million wildebeest gather on the southern plains of the Serengeti for calving season. The herds don’t all arrive at the same time in January.
  • Females synchronize their birthing, so about 500,000 wildebeest are born in a 3-week period (early Feb)
  • Sheer numbers give them a level of protection whilst the calves are still young. This many creatures need a lot of food. The southern plains have the most nutritious grass to sustain the numbers.
  • Despite significant predator action, the wildebeest stick around for as long as possible, as the grass is good & the calves gain strength.
  • As the grass dries out, the wildebeest start moving north- the timing of which is unpredictable and sadly doesn’t correspond with any fixed dates.

The Long Rains (April- May)

April – May is the long rainy season so the wildebeest move to locations where it has rained. They can scatter & almost disappear which seems crazy as there are hundreds of thousands of wildebeest in the great migration

  1. North to the Seronera area
  2. North-West via Kusini to the western corridor.
  3. Eastern border of the Serengeti.

Rutting Season (June)

  • Breeding season for the wildebeest takes place in June.
  • Birthing is synchronized so it figures that rutting is also synchronized.
  • In June, smaller family herds gather (often in close proximity) dominated by one male.
  • The lone male spends a great deal of energy protecting his females from males without their own harem,

River Crossing Season (July- October)

  • The Mara River starts in Kenya and runs north -south and then east to west in Tanzania
  • River Crossings generally start from mid-July (earliest).
  • Generally peak season is August & September but depends on the weather and rainfall.
  • The northern Serengeti (Tanzania) and Masai mara (Kenya) have more permanent water & grass attracting the wildebeest to the north. To get there they need to cross the Mara River.
  • It’s probably the most dramatic time of the migration as a river crossing is dangerous for the wildebeest. Hungry crocs & predators await, it’s easy to break a leg jumping into the river or drown during a crossing.
  • The crossings themselves generally involve a buildup of wildebeest numbers. The wildebeest can move up and down the Mara River looking for good spots to cross or to simply wait for more wildebeest to join the growing herd. The micro movement up and down the river with multiple hesitations and disruptions can and does drive people crazy! They just won’t cross until they decide.
  • The wildebeest can cross northwards but a little rain or fresh grass can bring them south again. Ultimately, they could cross the Mara River multiple times.
  • Book early as supplemental services get full (flights etc)
  • When it comes to river crossings – you have to have patience.  You can be at a great spot, with a large mass of wildebeest waiting to cross. The wildebeest can do nothing for 2 days …yet the moment you wake up late, they will all cross over in 20 minutes and you’ll find them standing on the opposite bank, with only a few fat crocs to show where they were!!!!

Waiting for Rain (November- January)

  • We call this final period “waiting for rain”! The short rains are usually in Nov-Dec but this can vary a lot.
  • In general, the wildebeest move southwards through the Serengeti to the southern plains… following water and rivers.
  • They can move in large herds or as small family groups as they make their way back towards those plains where the journey started in a seasonal yet variable repetition of events.

For human mortals – here is the month-by-month calendar version

  • January-February-March
    Dry months of the year. Wildebeest move south for calving season on the southern plains.
  • March
    Usually dry and before the long rains. Wildebeest start moving north as plains dry out.
  • April-May
    Long rains. Wildebeest on the move – mostly headed north and north-west. Access can be difficult, getting stuck is common. Interesting sightings and beautiful as very green with no dust.
  • June
    The transition to dry season. Can have dramatic clouds. Wildebeest rutting season, big herds in the west and NW. Some herds move up the eastern border of the Serengeti.
  • July-August-September
    Dry season and it coincides with northern hemisphere summer holidays. River crossing season of the migration in the northern Serengeti.
  • October
    The good conditions last into about mid-October when the buildup for the short rains begins. Can be spectacular and not particularly crowded. An untraditional “spring” brings new wild life.
  • November
    Tanzania’s short rainy season starts & continues until the beginning of December. Afternoon rains are common so be prepared for a shower. Uncrowded. Wildebeest location unpredictable.
  • December
    Rains can extend, and the mountain becomes popular over Festive Season and for new year goal setting trips. Wildebeest start moving south for calving season.

Bookings are open for River Crossing Season 2022 of the Great Wildebeest Migration.  info@greatmigrationcamps.com

Crossing Season Special – Wonders of the Wildebeest

Crossing Season is almost here whereby hundreds of thousands of wildebeest head to the northern Serengeti and Kenya in search of succulent grass and water, during the dry season. In the process the mighty Mara River stands in their way.

For many this is the highlight of the great wildebeest migration and there is little doubt that you want front row tickets to this part of the Great Migration Show.  Crossing season is an incredible spectacle – for any wildlife enthusiast it is a lifetime dream.  Take note that the Great Migration is an ongoing event taking place all year round as the herds travel on a cyclical grazing path around the Serengeti Masai Mara Eco-system.

Great Migration Camps recommends giving yourself enough time on your safari, with a minimum of 4 nights to increase your chances of seeing a river crossing. This season our very popular 9 Day Wonders of the Wildebeest package is on special for travel between 1 July – 30 Sept 2019 for those wishing to experience a river crossing.  You could save up to $300 per person travelling!

Wonders of the Wildebeest – 9 Day, 8 Night All inclusive package

Overview WoW crossing season special.

This 9 Day Migration Safari focuses on river crossings near the Mara River. During this period, the wildebeest move towards the northern sector of the Serengeti-Masai Mara eco-system, therefor we suggest you fly directly to the north to spend more time following the wildebeest. You have SIX full days in the Serengeti National Park (northern sector) following the wildebeest herds with all the build-up and action at the river.  Don’t worry, we see plenty of other wildlife in classic safari game drives.  You spend one night in Arusha, fly to Kogatende, enjoy a week of action packed safari, return flight to Arusha to end your tour.

Highlights WoW crossing season special

Flight over the Serengeti National Park, Wildebeest Migration, Mara River Crossings

Itinerary Overview  – WoW Crossing Season Special

Overnight Area Meals
Arrive in Arusha, transfer to hotel and overnight Ilboru Arusha
Flight Arusha to Serengeti Koga, afternoon game drives GMC mobile Mara River B, L, D
Unlimited Migration Game Drives – Full Day or 2 x Half Day Drives GMC mobile Mara River B, L, D
Unlimited Migration Game Drives – Full Day or 2 x Half Day Drives GMC mobile Mara River B, L, D
Unlimited Migration Game Drives – Full Day or 2 x Half Day Drives GMC mobile Mara River B, L, D
Unlimited Migration Game Drives – Full Day or 2 x Half Day Drives GMC mobile Mara River B, L, D
Unlimited Migration Game Drives – Full Day or 2 x Half Day Drives GMC mobile Mara River B, L, D
Unlimited Migration Game Drives – Full Day or 2 x Half Day Drives GMC mobile Serengeti B, L, D
Fly Serengeti Koga to Arusha for onward travel     B

Getting there

Tour Starts and ends in Arusha, Tanzania

Arusha in Northern Tanzania is the start and end point of this tour and is accessed by Kilimanjaro International Airport (JRO) or Arusha Airport (ARK). Flights from Arusha airport take you directly to the Northern Serengeti (Kogatende Airpstrip) and the heart of the migration.

Accommodation

Ilboru Safari Lodge (or similar). Mid-range accommodation in Arusha.

Great Migration Camps mobile tented camp. Tented accommodation in Serengeti National Park.

Great Migration Camps Mobile               
ACCOMMODATION
2-person canvas dome tent
Memory Foam Mattresses & Pillows
MEALS
Three Meals Daily
Drinking Water – clean, filtered
Great Coffee
TRANSPORT
Pop- up Roof 4×4 Safari Vehicle
Unlimited Migration Game Drives
DRINKS
Alcoholic Beverages & Sodas Excluded
Cash Bar. Unlimited tea & coffee
Cold Beer Chilled Wine Gin&Tonic
CHILD POLICY
Adults to accompany children U16 years
0-5 years must sleep in adult tent
6 -16 years may share with other children
MINIMUM NUMBERS
Minimum 4 persons for packages
Minimum 3 Night stay
Minimum 2 persons in camp
Best Outdoor Hot Showers in the Bush
EMERGENCY EVACUATION
Amref Service
Flying Doctor
SUSTAINABLE
We leave no trace. No single use plastic. Solar Power. Waste separation/management
Great
Bedding
& Linen
LOCATION – MAY CHANGE
We follow the wildebeest herds.
If they move, we move.
GUIDING
We take the road less travelled & avoid the crowds. Leave at dawn for golden hour prepared for full day game drives
Great Migration Experiences Guaranteed

WoW Crossing Season Package Activities

River Crossings and the wildebeest migration are the top priority on our programme, as such we prepare to head out at first light, to capture the golden hour at the start of the day and keep track of the wildebeest herds.  We are always fully prepared for a full day out, taking tea and coffee for a mid-morning break and bush lunch as one never knows what one might encounter.  The days are flexible and depend on the wildlife sightings and migration experiences that we encounter, meaning that some days we will return to camp for lunch and relaxation time in camp, whilst other days we travel far and return at dusk.  We try and stop for an evening drink to watch the setting sun, before returning to camp to freshen up for the evening. Evenings are enjoyed around the camp fire, and meals are cooked over hot coals in the spirit of a truly mobile safari camp following the herds.

WoW Crossing Season Package Includes

1 N Accommodation in Arusha (B&B), 7 N Tented Accommodation at GMC mobile in the Serengeti National Park, three meals daily, teas and coffees, laundry, communal ablutions, emergency evacuation insurance (flying doctor cover), VAT, National Park Fees entrance fees and camping fees, all transfers, return domestic flights to the Serengeti National Park.

WoW Crossing Season Package Excludes

Gratuities, Alcoholic beverages & sodas (cash bar), international flights, visas, travel insurance, all items of a personal nature, any meals not stipulated

WoW Crossing Season Child Policy: Children are welcome

Under 16 of years of age, children to be accompanied by an adult.
0 – 5 years must sleep in adult tent. 6 -16 years may share with other children, however we recommend children should be able to sleep through the night.

WoW Crossing Season Package Rates

9D8N Wonders of the Wildebeest Adult 16+ Child* 0-5 Child* 5- 12 Child* 12- 16
Standard Package 2019 4100.00 470.00 2000.00 2750.00
Fly In Special 2019 3800.00 470.00 1820.00 2540.00
  • Rates are quoted in US Dollars and include VAT.

WoW Crossing Season Package – How to book

  1. Check Live Availability  to see if we can accommodate you at Great Migration Camps.  Send your request.
  2. Email your inquiry to info@greatmigrationcamps.com.
    Kindly provide your name, country, number of people travelling and preferred dates and duration.
  3. GMC will confirm your reservation and assist with any extra services you may require.
  4. Complete your Traveller Registration Form and Sign the Booking Terms and Conditions
  5. GMC will send an invoice, a 30% deposit is payable to secure the reservation. Balance due before arrival.
  6. Confirmation, a summary of services and any travel vouchers will be issued on receipt of final payment.

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Top 5 Tips to Experience a Wildebeest River Crossing

Great Migration Camps wildebeest researcher, Carel Verhoef, has witnessed hundreds of river crossings, and explains what happens in the build up to a river crossing and how best to experience the “Greatest Show on Earth”.

Carel has an incredible strike rate getting his clients, not just to the wildebeest migration, but to witness river crossing(s)! Having studied and followed the great wildebeest migration for more than 15 years, he shares his Top 5 Tips for maximising your opportunities for a wildebeest river crossings. Read to the end for his Bonus Tip.

Top 5 Tips to Experience a River Crossing

River Crossing Tip 1: You need to get to the Mara River at the right time

When planning your “river crossing safari”, it’s important to deal with a knowledgeable company and consultant who have the knowledge to get you to the right place. Great Migration Camps provides Migration Updates on our Facebook page. GMC is in the privileged position of being able to move camp as the wildebeest move, ensuring we have the latest migration news and updates. Guides, pilots, managers, lodges, camps and colleagues all supply news and updates on the movement and location of the wildebeest.  Ask GMC to help with your safari plans and timings.

River Crossing Tip 2: Buy yourself as much time as you can on the river itself

If you are really want to see a river crossing, then buy as many nights as close to the river as you can. The decision of a herd to cross the river is not taken lightly and they need to build up numbers and energy to do the crossing. It can take days for the right conditions, often leaving visitors frustrated at the anticipated event that doesn’t materialise. Wildlife takes time, you have to be in it to see it and experience it – river crossings are no different! The longer you have the better your chances. (See our packages)

The good news is that the area around the Mara River (on both the Serengeti and Masai Mara sides), has plenty of resident plains game and a huge quantity of big cats. This gives you the opportunity for a classic safari to view general game that could include lion, leopard, elephant, buffalo, cheetah, hyena, jackal and much much more.

River Crossing Tip 3:  Wait for the energy to build up

The higher the water level in the Mara River, the more difficult it is to cross. The jumps are intimidating and this means that the wildebeest and zebra need to build up enough energy before they leap into the crocodile infested waters. Give yourself a few days for the wildebeest numbers to build up on the river itself and do some great game viewing or bird watching while the herds gather. The potential for a crossing is greater if there are wildebeest on both sides of the river. You will immediately realise that there might be enough energy if you hear the wildebeest calls becoming louder and more frequent. The noise can be like a giant humming.

River Crossing Tip 4: Position yourself away from the river

Don’t sit too close to the river bank – this might block the herds without your knowledge. Any barrier or obstruction can prevent the wildebeest from crossing the river. Position yourself some distance away from the riverbank, preferably slightly obscured so that you can allow the wildebeest herds to move unobstructed to the water’s edge or choose their crossing point. This way you won’t interfere. Don’t worry if you don’t have a perfect view at this stage – keep your eyes peeled for the dust as the crossing starts and the noise intensity increases. Then and only then should you move closer. Once the crossing has started it will not stop because so much energy has been created. You will easily get within a few hundred meters from the crossing herds. Moving to the river too quickly can prevent a crossing and leave you with a few days more to wait.

River Crossing Tip 5:  Stay Observant

It is surprisingly easy to get stuck waiting for one herd of wildebeest to cross – especially if there are good herd numbers arriving at the river. Make sure you look up and downstream from your waiting position for other possible crossings that could be imminent. Stay observant and alert to all the build-ups on the river bank. Notice weather patterns and the behaviour of other animals. Leopards have been known to walk behind waiting safari vehicles with not a single client seeing the magical creature taking a stroll right behind them – all eyes focused on the river.

Hot Tip

During a river crossing, stop to soak up the atmosphere – it is an incredible experience. Don’t just stare through your view-finder taking pictures. Feel the energy before, during and after the crossing; let the sounds echo through you as the visual show unfolds. When you do take pictures, make sure you don’t over zoom, you need the wider angle to capture the magnitude of what is happening.

BONUS TIP:  Both Sides of the Mara River

Don’t let an international border stop you from seeing a river crossing. If you are really serious about seeing a river crossing then give yourself the best possible chance by going to both the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania and the Masai Mara in Kenya. If you are travelling during July and August visit the Serengeti first followed by the Masai Mara.  During September and October, visit the Masai Mara first and finish your stay in Tanzania the Serengeti. This drastically increases your chances of seeing the wildebeest herds cross the river.

Map of the Mara River Basin. Source: www.frontiersin.org

How to book

  • Ask us.  We’d love to help you.  The earlier you enquire, the less chance to be disappointed, especially during peak periods when other services can also be fully booked.
  • We can assist with tours before or after your safari, additional accommodation in town – as well as flights or transport in and out of the National Park.
  • We recommend 5- 10 days for your migration safari, especially during Crossing season.
  • Email your inquiry to info@greatmigrationcamps.com. Kindly provide your name, country, number of people travelling and preferred dates and duration.  Children of all ages are welcome.

Check Live Availability

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August 2018 – Migration Updates

Great Migration Camps checked in with Wildebeest Whisperer, Carel Verhoef, about an action packed month following the wildebeest in their cyclical quest for food and water.  Here are the latest updates and predictions for the Great Wildebeest Migration.  Great Migration Camps has also had Migration Updates from guides, camps and lodges out in the field.

Take a look at the incredible journey of survival as the great wildebeest migration meets the Mara River in 2018. Footage from this season – the build-up, the action, the crossings, the successes and the fatalities.

The Wildebeest Migration in August 2018

The first little crossings happened in early July but as we predicted August has again been the best month for river crossings on the Serengeti side. Big herds of wildebeest crossed the Western Corridor in late July and they congregated in large numbers near Makutano and Nyamalumbwa  Hills, as there was lots and lots of grazing.  Initially these herds started moving north – predominantly through the Eastern sector of the Serengeti, with numerous crossings at the Sand River.  There were also some good crossings between Makutano and Crossing Point No 7 at the end of July and early August.

However Nature, being what it is, decided to throw some good widespread rains (40-50mm) over the Central and Northern Serengeti in early August.  Within a week, short new grass was sprouting on the plains, rejuvenating huge areas that had been burnt by TANAPA authorities south of the Mara River, all along the Kichwa Tembo road and Ndasiato. These juicy grasses, lured the wildebeest southwards and the big herds moved onto the Lamai Wedge and then south to the plains beyond Kuria Hills.  Some fabulous south-bound crossings between Crossing Point No 4 and No 7.

Finally, in the past few days, there has been a bigger push north by the herds, to the Mara Reserve and Mara Triangle in Kenya.  At last there have been some sizeable crossings on the Kenyan side.

Must Watch Video! Crocodile takes wildebeest during 2018 Migration Crossing Season.

Migration Update: 3 August 2018

Huge rain on the Serengeti side and a shift of movement back to the south, will this drive the herds back to the Serengeti? Watch the video of the herds on the plains sent by Carel here 

Migration Update: 30 July 2018.

Crossings continue from south to north towards the Lamai Wedge and the Masai Mara. Yesssss! See the video from guide, Hamza Nyelo here

Migration Update: 7 August 2018

Huge crossing of 2 hours from north to south at Number 1 on the Serengeti Side. Wonderful day on the Mara River.  See the river crossing video from Carel here

Migration Update: 12 August 2018

Two hour crossing from north to south, new grass on the plains after extensive burning and recent rain driving the herds back south between the Kitchwa Tembo road and the Sand River, daily crossings.

Migration Update: 13 August 2018

Huge crossing at No 3 in front of Lemala Mara.  Video capture by Frank Gabriel here

Migration Update: 16 August 2018

This update from guide Onesmus Ole Irungu as huge herds arrive on the Masai Mara side – nice month ahead on the Mara triangle or reserve sides. See the pictures here

Migration Update: 18 August 2018

Baraka Willium from Lemala reports daily crossings and the herds on the move again back to the north. Watch the video here

Migration Update: 18 August 2018

The wildebeest keep coming on the Serengeti side. Update from Alex Walker Serian’s Serengeti North camp. See rivercrossing video here

Migration Update: 19 August 2018

Big crossings video on the Kenyan side, from guide Sammy Kaleku as the wildebeest move from East to West across the Mara River in Kenya. See video here

Migration Predictions

Good crossings are expected on the Kenyan side of the eco-system throughout September. It will be interesting to see how far north the herds venture this year, with a year of unpredictable weather and patterns.  The Serengeti side should continue with some river crossings as the wildebeest continue to move northwards.

Great Migration Camps Availability

Great Migrations Camps will be moving to Kenya – on the Mara Triangle side of the Masai Mara Reserve.
Limited spaces still available at special campsite Kiboko in the southern Mara Triangle until 20th Sept. Or join us when we move just south of Little Governors camps from 20th to the end of September.

Game Package Rates $330 and Full board Rates $230 (excludes Park Fees and getting there).
Contact us for last minute specials or resident rates.

Contact: +255 686 493 065 |  Email: info@greatmigrationcamps.com

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